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Global Cities of the New World

Who are you? Prove it!

Post by Laura Drummond

Today, adult Americans routinely get carded. Whether boarding a plane or buying a beer, we are accustomed to pulling out an official government-issued photo ID on demand. But in the early days of the nation, no such ID existed, and the stakes were much higher than a missed flight or an alcohol-free evening if adequate proofs of identity were not produced. Continue reading “Who are you? Prove it!”

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Alcibiades of the Atlantic

Post by Ethan Key

When under threat, ancient Rome gave absolute power as dictator to the patrician Cincinnatus. Cincinnatus defeated the invading army. As a rare exception to Lord Acton’s maxim that “power tends to corrupt, and absolute power tends to corrupt absolutely,” Cincinnatus then gave up all of that power to return to life on his farm. Continue reading “Alcibiades of the Atlantic”

American Citizenship: From Revolution to Birtherism

Post by Shawn Dommer

In his presidential campaign of 2016 the Republican Party nominee, Donald Trump, finally publicly stated that President Obama was, in fact, born in the United States. This was a piece of information that the great majority of American citizens had already accepted. Continue reading “American Citizenship: From Revolution to Birtherism”

What’s in a Name? Qualitative Terming in New France’s Military History

Post by Anna Tucker

Base image: Christian Crouch, Nobility Lost: French and Canadian Martial Cultures, Indians, and the End of New France (Cornell University Press, 2014): xiii.
Base image: Christian Crouch, Nobility Lost: French and Canadian Martial Cultures, Indians, and the End of New France (Cornell University Press, 2014): xiii.

April 2015 marked the sesquicentennial of the Civil War. While many focused on military battles or ongoing racial tensions, few noted the 150-year transformation and transmutation of the conflict’s name, a name that existed at any given time as “Great Rebellion, “The Late Unpleasantness,” or the “War of the Rebellion.” Each title employs a narrative relative to its origin and its contemporary use; if an anecdotal experiment is warranted to test this claim, try tossing a sardonic “War of Northern Aggression” into an upcoming conversation.

This leads us to the question, how do terminologies—especially on an institutional level—reflect the interpretation of events, individuals, and spaces? Continue reading “What’s in a Name? Qualitative Terming in New France’s Military History”

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